Banshee

Banshee boat lettering

(/ˈbænʃ/ ban-shee, Modern Irish bean sí, from Old Irish: ban síde, pronounced [bʲan ˈʃiːðʲe], “woman of the fairy mound” or “fairy woman”) is a female spirit in Irish mythology who heralds the death of a family member, usually by shrieking or keening.

Banshee boat graphics

Her name is connected to the mythologically-important tumuli or “mounds” that dot the Irish countryside, which are known as síde (singular síd) in Old Irish.[1]

The banshee is often described in Gaelic lore as wearing red or green, usually with long, disheveled hair (usually described as red or orange, and yellow in medieval times described to shimmer like wild fire). Banshee boat graphics

She can appear in a variety of forms. Perhaps most often she is seen as an ugly, frightful hag, but she can also appear young and beautiful if she chooses. Banshee boat name

In some tales, the figure who first appears to be a banshee or other cailleach (hag) is later revealed to be the Irish battle goddess, Morrígan.

 

 

 

Banshee boat lettering

In some parts of Leinster, she is referred to as the bean chaointe (keening woman) whose wail can be so piercing that it shatters glass. Banshee boat vinyl graphics

In Scottish folklore, a similar creature is known as the bean nighe or ban nigheachain (little washerwoman) or nigheag na h-àth (little washer at the ford) and is seen washing the bloodstained clothes or armour of those who are about to die. In Welsh folklore, a similar creature is known as the hag of the mist.[5]

 

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